How to organize your Slack workspace

Slack is the professional communication platform. This communication takes different forms from employee to employee, public or private, from application to person, and so on. The workflow options for Slack are nearly endless. The way you organize your Slack workspace should match the way you organize work. Slack is the professional communication platform. This communication takes different forms from employee to employee, public or private, from application to person, and so on. The workflow options for Slack are nearly endless. With all these options, Slack offers different types of spaces for different types of communications. The way you organize your Slack workspace should match the way you organize work. Slack organizes Slack workspaces into groups in Slack apps. These groups are: 1. Connections: these spaces are for external channels, called Slack Connect, and external users called Guests. Slack channels: These spaces are the main place for interaction in Slack (see below).3. Direct Messages: These spaces are for individual and group conversations (see below).4. Apps: These spaces are for Slack App Directory apps. For the purposes of this section, we’ll focus on channels and direct messages (DMs). Channels Slack channels can be organized according to the way you work: projects, tasks, teams, etc. Slack channels can be public or private. Channels may optionally have topics defined and changed from time to time to explicitly direct conversations. There’s no limit to the number of channels you create in Slack, but you should align the channels you create in Slack with how you organize your work. Public channels do not contain all Slack workspace members, but all workspace members can search and join channels. Public channels in Slack are indicated by a “#” at the beginning of the channel name, such as “#general”. Be careful what you share in public channels, because anyone in the workspace can find and browse all posts in a channel. Private channels can only be discovered by invitation from a channel member. And content and files shared in private channels can only be searched by members of those channels. Private channels are marked with a padlock symbol at the beginning of the channel name. Although these private channels are invite-only, be aware of channel members when posting content. You can verify private channel members in the Slack desktop app, web app, and mobile apps. Direct MessagesDirect messages, or DMs, are private spaces that can be one-on-one or include a group of up to 9 people (group DM). These are private spaces. Files and messages in DMs can only be searched by Slack users in those DMSs. If DMs exceed 9 people or if it makes sense to make DMs a more permanent conversation, a DM can be converted to a private channel. When you convert a DM to a private channel, any member you add to the private channel will be able to see the DM’s history messages and files.—-Context matters, especially with asynchronous communication in tools like Slack. Organizing your Slack workspace helps create context for how work gets done. Slack channels and DMs are the places that define context in Slack. Be aware of your space, Slack channel (public channel or private channel) or DM, in Slack and use that context to inform how you interact and what content you share.‍

*** This is a syndicated blog from the Security Bloggers Network of Haekka Blog written by Haekka Blog. Read the original post at: https://www.haekka.com/blog/how-to-organize-your-slack-workspace

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