Blog content – Ascension Risk Management http://ascensionriskmanagement.com/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 02:30:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Blog content – Ascension Risk Management http://ascensionriskmanagement.com/ 32 32 How will the Tampa Bay Buccaneers fill the void – on and off the court – left by the retirement of Rob Gronkowski? – Tampa Bay Buccaneers Blog https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/how-will-the-tampa-bay-buccaneers-fill-the-void-on-and-off-the-court-left-by-the-retirement-of-rob-gronkowski-tampa-bay-buccaneers-blog/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 22:17:12 +0000 https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/how-will-the-tampa-bay-buccaneers-fill-the-void-on-and-off-the-court-left-by-the-retirement-of-rob-gronkowski-tampa-bay-buccaneers-blog/ TAMPA, Fla. — While the Tampa Bay Buccaneers held out hope that tight end Rob Gronkowski would return for the 2022 season, the future Hall of Famer decided to call it a career again on Tuesday, two years after quitting. his retirement to join quarterback Tom Brady. Gronkowski’s agent, Drew Rosenhaus, told Adam Schefter of […]]]>

TAMPA, Fla. — While the Tampa Bay Buccaneers held out hope that tight end Rob Gronkowski would return for the 2022 season, the future Hall of Famer decided to call it a career again on Tuesday, two years after quitting. his retirement to join quarterback Tom Brady.

Gronkowski’s agent, Drew Rosenhaus, told Adam Schefter of ESPN that he could see Gronk join the Bucs later this season if his longtime friend Brady asked. For now, the Bucs will carry on without him, without the “tuddies,” as he called the touchdowns — usually accompanied by a mischievous laugh — and with a void that can’t be filled by one person since Gronk has done it all.

With the departure of former first-round pick OJ Howard in free agency, the Bucs have an experienced tight end in Cameron Brate, who plays the “F” role and is mostly a passer. Behind him is Codey McElroy, also an “F” who has had a strong spring, but he has played one regular season game and is learning to use his 6-foot-6, 258-pound frame as a tackle.

The Bucs selected two tight ends in the 2022 NFL Draft — Cade Otton in the fourth round from the University of Washington and Ko Kieft in the sixth round from the University of Iowa. Otton has the potential to play the role of the “Y” as both a line blocker and pass catcher, but he did not attend rookie or mandatory minicamp because he is recovering from surgery at ankle. Kieft, at 6ft 5in and 265lbs, is purely a blocker – and was an excellent one in college – but will be limited as a road runner, as he ran a 4.98 second dash over 40 yards at his pro day.

The Bucs need some help at the position if they hope to maintain Brady’s propensity to throw for tight ends. Over the past two regular seasons, the Bucs have attempted 306 passes to tight ends — the fourth-most in the league. Their 38 tight end attempts in the end zone over the past two seasons were the most in the NFL.

Eric Ebron, Jimmy Graham, Kyle Rudolph and Jared Cook are among the free agent options Tampa Bay could pursue. The Bucs have $10,596,585 in salary cap space, according to Roster Management System. Ebron is 29, Rudolph 32 and Graham and Cook 35.

Cook played in 16 regular-season games last season, amassing 564 receiving yards, four touchdowns and 31 first downs with the Los Angeles Chargers, but he also had five retirements. Rudolph played 15 games and had 257 yards and a touchdown with the New York Giants. Graham had 167 receiving yards in 11 games and scored three touchdowns for the Chicago Bears.

Ebron caught 12 passes for the Pittsburgh Steelers last season before going on reserve with a right knee problem that required surgery. He was medically cleared. In 2020, he had 56 catches for 558 receiving yards and five touchdowns for the Steelers. Graham had eight touchdown passes in 2020, Cook had seven.

None of those players have the chemistry Gronk had with Brady, who will report to training camp in five weeks for what could be his final season after retiring for 40 days earlier this spring.

As Brady said last year, “A lot of football is about anticipating what the problems will be, rather than trying to figure out how to fix the problem after the game. I think it’s a lot part of solving the problem before things happen. Gronk, he knows what I’m thinking, I know what he’s thinking. We’ve been doing it for so long together. It’s really nice. It’s a big luxury for two-position players like that who have been playing together for as long as we have.”

The Bucs will miss more than Gronk’s contributions on the field. Not only did he provide experience as a four-time Super Bowl winner, his coaching demeanor lifted the mood of those around him as he found a way to work hard but keep things going. light-hearted and fun, with a knack for identifying teammates or coaches. need a push.

Brady said in a post on social media shortly after the news broke on Tuesday, “Even more important is the person he was off the pitch. Focused when needed and FUN the rest of the time. Having Gronk in your locker room was a dream of all NFL players.”

He performed in the community. Among Gronkowski’s most notable efforts was replacing $15,000 worth of football equipment and a storage shed that was destroyed by arson at Blake High School in Tampa in 2020, his freshman year with the team. .

“I don’t think he’s ever had a bad day, to be honest with you,” offensive coordinator Byron Leftwich said last year. “He smiles all the time, he has fun all the time. “Old Gronkitis” – that’s what we call it. Gronkite. He’s having fun, man. He has fun, he likes football, [and] the work he does is real [and] is serious. It’s just amazing the way he sees the world, not just the way he sees football.

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Live Updates: Russia Replaces Saudi Arabia as China’s Largest Crude Oil Supplier https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/live-updates-russia-replaces-saudi-arabia-as-chinas-largest-crude-oil-supplier/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 10:11:03 +0000 https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/live-updates-russia-replaces-saudi-arabia-as-chinas-largest-crude-oil-supplier/ A train sits at North Acton station in London. The Metro faces another staff walkout © John Sibley / Reuters What started with misery at the pumps due to rising fuel prices, then air travel disruption due to understaffing will this week spread to problems on trains – in the country that gave you this […]]]>

A train sits at North Acton station in London. The Metro faces another staff walkout © John Sibley / Reuters

What started with misery at the pumps due to rising fuel prices, then air travel disruption due to understaffing will this week spread to problems on trains – in the country that gave you this mode transport. A series of nationwide rail strikes and, in London, another underground strike, threaten to cripple the network.

The dispute centers on wage demands and the impact on jobs of efficiency savings made more urgent by falling incomes during pandemic shutdowns. Government ministers, who as this article notes now effectively control all rail funding following changes made during the pandemic, declined to speak directly with the RMT, the main union calling for action.

Whether this will have a big impact on Thursday’s two UK by-elections – this week’s top election news – is a moot point given that the poll already points to a double whammy for the Tories – a “red wall” and a “ blue wall” constituency – amid anger at their leader and the country’s Prime Minister, Boris Johnson.

The aviation industry will also be in the spotlight this week as the annual general meeting of the International Air Transport Association (Iata) is held in Doha. The news here is unlikely to be very positive. Last October, Iata predicted that 2.3 billion people would fly in 2021 and 3.4 billion in 2022, compared to 4.5 billion people who traveled in 2019.

Another international gathering this week will be the delayed meeting of Commonwealth Heads of State in Rwanda. The venue will provoke uncomfortable questions for Prince Charles, who will attend on behalf of the Queen, given the UK’s deal with the country to take in British asylum seekers, a policy the heir to the throne had described as “appalling” according to a report in the Times newspaper.

The week will end with German Chancellor Olaf Scholz hosting his counterparts from other G7 nations for a summit at Bavaria’s secluded Schloss Elmau castle, the same venue his predecessor Angela Merkel chose in 2015. The most notable point here, however , is special guest , India’s Narendra Modi, and whether it will help the Western powers – Australia will do something similar during a state visit to India earlier in the week – in the battle for allies to counter the growing closeness between Russia and China.

Economic data

Polls are the theme this week with a series of Purchasing Managers’ Index reports, regional announcements from the Fed in the US and Ifo Business Confidence figures in Germany.

The culmination of speeches by central bankers — and there are a few this week — will be Jay Powell’s semiannual appearance before the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee to present his report on monetary policy. And in case you don’t have enough cost of living data, we’ll also get more inflation updates from Germany, Canada, the UK and Japan.

Companies

A Carrefour in Saint-Herblain, on the outskirts of Nantes

Among the speakers at the Consumer Goods Forum, Alexandre Bompard, CEO of Carrefour © Loïc Venance/AFP/Getty Images

Cost of living and shopping trends will be at the heart of discussions among global retail groups meeting in Dublin this week for the Consumer Goods Forum. The business leaders of Unilever, Coca-Cola, Carrefour, Tesco and walmart are on the list of speakers.

Not many results announcements this week. FedEx will release fourth-quarter numbers on Thursday, but that was anticipated last week as the U.S. delivery company shrugged off concerns about the economy when it announced a dividend increase and two new board members.

Read the full schedule for the coming week here

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Stocks stem losses but still close worst week since March 2020 https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/stocks-stem-losses-but-still-close-worst-week-since-march-2020/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 23:20:00 +0000 https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/stocks-stem-losses-but-still-close-worst-week-since-march-2020/ Placeholder while loading article actions Investors got some relief on Friday after a sharp turn in losses, but Wall Street still closed its worst week since the chaotic early days of the coronavirus pandemic, as the Federal Reserve’s aggressive push to tame inflation – and the danger of triggering a recession – has begun to […]]]>
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Investors got some relief on Friday after a sharp turn in losses, but Wall Street still closed its worst week since the chaotic early days of the coronavirus pandemic, as the Federal Reserve’s aggressive push to tame inflation – and the danger of triggering a recession – has begun to set in.

The Dow Jones Industrial fell 38 points, or 0.1%, a day after the blue chip index fell below 30,000 for the first time since January 2021. The S&P 500 rose 8 points or 0.2%, while the tech-heavy Nasdaq climbed 152 points. or 1.4 percent.

Investors are still grappling with the Fed’s momentous decision to raise interest rates by three-quarters of a percentage point. This decision has far-reaching consequences for consumers, as it makes borrowing money and credit card balances more expensive. New data released on Wednesday also pointed to a bumpier road, with higher unemployment, slower economic growth and record prices that will take longer to come back down.

Recession fears grow as Dow closes below 30,000 and mortgage rates soar

Mortgages, for example, have become much more expensive this week: a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage hit 5.78% this week, according to Freddie Mac. Just a week ago it was 5.23, marking the biggest one-week jump since 1987.

“The housing market is not crashing, but it is experiencing a hangover as it descends from an unsustainable high,” Redfin deputy chief economist Taylor Marr said in a blog post on Thursday. . “The demand for housing has already cooled considerably to the point that the industry has started to face layoffs. This week’s rate hikes will further stretch homebuyers’ budgets to the point that many more could be unaffordable,” he said.

Rates have almost doubled in recent months: a 30-year fixed rate loan, the most popular option, was close to 3% in November. The difference would add about $700 to the monthly mortgage on a $500,000 home, according to a Washington Post analysis. Over the life of the loan, the rate increase adds up to $256,000 in additional payments, more than half the price of the home.

The median home price in the United States was $391,200, according to the latest data from the National Association of Realtors, released last month.

“While many home sellers are already lowering prices, more homeowners are likely to decide to stay put now that the mortgage rate for a new home is significantly higher than what they are currently experiencing,” said Marr of Redfin. .

Americans brave enough to take a look at their 401(k) or other investment accounts have likely been faced with some ugly calculations. Portfolios spanning nearly every sector suffered declines, and color-coded grids showing stock gains and losses flashed a solid wall of red. The S&P 500, a key benchmark for measuring financial performance over time, has lost nearly a quarter of its value this year.

The broad index fell 5.8% for the week, its biggest loss since the public health crisis began in March 2020. The Nasdaq and Dow Jones both fell 5% for the week, highlighting the pessimism seeping into Wall Street.


The S&P 500 has the worst week

since March 2020

Monday kicked off a bear market

after higher than expected

inflation data

Stocks fall

following the Fed

rising interest rates

The S&P 500 has the worst week

since March 2020

Monday kicked off a bear market

after higher than expected

inflation data

Stocks fall after

Fed interest rate hike

and rising mortgage rates

But it’s not just investor sentiment that has deteriorated. Higher interest rates are designed to induce US consumers to spend less money, which dampens demand for products and services. While Fed Chairman Jerome H. Powell has defended the decision to aggressively raise interest rates to contain inflation, some experts worry the strategy could result in overreaction and plunge the economy into a recession later this year or in 2023. Further rate hikes are expected in the coming months, but they may come in smaller increments.

Investors will also look to corporate earnings for the next few quarters to gauge how executives are interpreting a potential economic downtown. Many U.S. management teams foresee hurdles ahead as rising costs and uncertainty around inflation slow demand for their products.

“These latest signals build on reduced projections from economists around the world as growth expectations have been tempered by a cocktail of persistent supply chain shortages, high inflation and heightened geopolitical uncertainty,” said Nicole Tanenbaum, Partner and Chief Investment Strategist. Financial management of ladies.

Richard Saperstein, chief investment officer of Treasury Partners, said the market was reacting to uncertainty surrounding the Fed’s efforts to control inflation. But he said an additional concern remains the unpredictable events related to the ongoing war in Ukraine that the market has not fully priced in.

As Wall Street goes wild, gasoline prices continue to climb as inflation has yet to peak, according to the latest data that may have surprised policymakers hoping for lower prices. But the economy has added several million jobs this year and consumer spending remains robust. The mixed signals present a conundrum to analysts and political leaders and highlight uncertainty about the future of the economy.

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Do we need a better understanding of ‘progress’? https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/do-we-need-a-better-understanding-of-progress/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 23:36:47 +0000 https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/do-we-need-a-better-understanding-of-progress/ The stagnation hypothesis is not universally accepted. Ideas can be combined and recombined, creating a combinatorial explosion of new innovations, an effect that counteracts the swallowing of fruit at hand. And some pointed out that if you measure research productivity and impact differentlythe picture is much rosier. Nevertheless, the fear of stagnation is a central […]]]>

The stagnation hypothesis is not universally accepted. Ideas can be combined and recombined, creating a combinatorial explosion of new innovations, an effect that counteracts the swallowing of fruit at hand. And some pointed out that if you measure research productivity and impact differentlythe picture is much rosier.

Nevertheless, the fear of stagnation is a central motivation for many people in the progress community. Unlike Gordon, however, they are optimistic about their ability to change it – which brings us to the story of the founding of the progress studies movement.

The origin of progress studies

Around 2016, Cowen received an out-of-the-box email from Irish billionaire Patrick Collison, who was interested in his book, The Great Stagnation. A few years earlier, Collison had co-founded online payment company Stripe and now wanted to talk about bigger issues. The couple had a few dinners together in San Francisco and hit it off.

Cowen and Collison are both infovores. Collison published his entire volume of nearly 800 bookshelf on his personal site (although he admits to having only read about half of it). by Cowen practice to ruthlessly skim through books for the informational value they contain and then abandon them – sometimes after five minutes – can send shivers down the spine of some finalists.

Cowen’s information production is almost as prolific as his consumption. The 60-year-old economist is the author of almost 20 books, 40 paperssix years of Bloomberg Columnsmore than 150 episodes of sound podcastand nearly 20 years of blog posts on his famous economics blog marginal revolution. During our conversation, Cowen’s voice was hoarse from the marathon of interviews he conducted to promote his latest book. In 2020, Cowen placed 17th on a listing of the 100 most influential economists.

Collison, nearly three decades younger and leading the fourth most valuable private startup around the world, wrote less, but still found time to post collections of links on topics like air pollution, Culture, growth, Silicon Valley Historyand of course, progress. Stripe’s nearly $100bn (£83bn/€95bn) valuation puts Collison up net value north of $11bn (£9bn/€10.5bn). The online payment company combines the lofty “change the world” rhetoric of Silicon Valley startups with the mundane, competent construction of an infrastructure company.

During the pair’s meetings, Cowen tells me, “we were both talking about the ideas, finding that we had common ideas, and somehow we came across the notion of an article. “. So, in 2019, they co-wrote a writing in The Atlantic, which argued for “a new science of progress”.

“There is no large-scale intellectual movement focused on understanding the dynamics of progress or aiming at the deeper goal of accelerating it. We believe it deserves a dedicated field of study,” they said. they wrote. “We propose to inaugurate the discipline of ‘progress studies'”.

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Sky News Australia is a global hub for climate misinformation, report says | Sky News Australia https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/sky-news-australia-is-a-global-hub-for-climate-misinformation-report-says-sky-news-australia/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 23:24:00 +0000 https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/sky-news-australia-is-a-global-hub-for-climate-misinformation-report-says-sky-news-australia/ Australia’s Sky News has become a central source of climate science misinformation around the world, gaining popularity among conservative social media influencers and networks, according to a report. An analysis of a global network of climate science deniers and ‘retarders’ and the content they shared found the News Corp Australia-owned channel was a key ‘content […]]]>

Australia’s Sky News has become a central source of climate science misinformation around the world, gaining popularity among conservative social media influencers and networks, according to a report.

An analysis of a global network of climate science deniers and ‘retarders’ and the content they shared found the News Corp Australia-owned channel was a key ‘content hub’ for ‘influencers, skeptics and selling points”.

Analysis, published by the British think tank Institute for Strategic Dialoguesaid Sky News Australia, owned by Rupert Murdoch, has consistently ranked among the best for traction, pushing the partisan views of its hosts and guests to global audiences via social media networks.

Sky News Australia said it rejected the report’s findings, saying it would ‘continue to encourage debate’ on climate change in its programmes.

The report looked at how antagonistic views to action on climate change are spreading around the world, how content is created and who is influential in spreading these views.

The report states: “Our analysis showed how a small but dedicated community of actors enjoys disproportionate reach and engagement on social media, reaching millions around the world and bolstered by legacy print media, audiovisual and radio.

A failure to stem “online misinformation and disinformation” has allowed junk science, climate retardation and attacks on figures working on the climate crisis to become widespread,” the report said.

He said Sky News Australia and contributors to News Corp’s stable of columnists had formed a “content production and distribution system” that fostered “skepticism about climate science and fear or confusion around mitigation efforts”.

Chris Cooper, director of Purpose, an Australian-based consultancy which works with organizations to increase their impact and which helped carry out analysis for the report, said: “Australia appears to have two significant export industries . One is from emissions related to fossil fuel exports and the other is from the content of these prolific media.

He said Sky News Australia now had a “disproportionate contribution to global climate misinformation”. “We see the content being shared through networks of deniers around the world.”

Social media was monetized through algorithms that prioritized “everything outrageous and engaging,” Cooper said, and that meant climate misinformation “reached millions more people than it would otherwise.”

The report claims Sky News Australia has produced its own partisan content through the views of its hosts, and also provides a platform for influencers around the world who are undermining the need for action on the climate crisis.

In one example, a tweet by Canadian climate science denier Patrick Moore – retweeted 16,000 times – promoted a Sky News Australia segment where former host Alan Jones described young climate activists as “selfish, ill-bred little turds signaling virtue”.

Most of the segments, which are regularly edited into shareable videos, are from Sky News Australia’s “after dark” shows.

Sky News Australia host Rita Panahi is identified in the report as a “key amplifier” alongside other personalities around the world.

Analysis showed that before 2017, Sky News Australia posted an average of 25 tweets per month on climate-related issues. But they now average over 100 posts per month, with peaks of up to 300 per month.

Cooper said the aim of the report was to raise awareness of the extent of climate misinformation and disinformation around the world, and the “actors behind it”.

Another goal, he said, was to detail for climate change action advocates how misinformation is spreading across the world.

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“No one is against free speech,” Cooper said. “But it’s about the amplification and dissemination of what is clearly disinformation, and that’s the problem.”

Dismissing the report’s findings, a spokesperson for Sky News Australia said: ‘Sky News Australia broadcasts a wide range of views on complex climate issues, including the broadcast of a major documentary coinciding with the conference on climate change in Glasgow which looked at nuclear energy. as a possible long-term solution to achieving net zero emissions by 2050.”

“We will continue to encourage debate on the varied and evolving climate-related policies of governments, businesses, scientists and campaign groups.”

The report identified the five most popular sources of content shared between the “retarders”, which were the Daily Mail, the Guardian, the Daily Telegraph and the Whatsupwiththat blog.

The report said the Guardian was “anomalous in this section, in that the stories shared were not themselves misleading or warranted fact checks, but were nonetheless used to support opposition attack lines. selecting data or adopting a “culture wars” framework.

The report identified key “delay talk” being used to undermine action on the climate crisis, particularly ahead of and during the UN climate talks in Glasgow in 2021.

These included attacks on “unreliable renewable energy” or the alleged inefficiency of electric vehicles. Other popular themes were singling out major emitters – often China – and using their high emissions to absolve other countries of the need to act, or arguing that climate action advocates were wealthy elites and were part of a “New World Order”.

More broadly, the report says climate change denial and attacks on renewable energy often coexist with anti-trans and anti-lockdown sentiments, as well as misinformation about the pandemic.

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How to boost your company’s social networks with video | Yelp https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/how-to-boost-your-companys-social-networks-with-video%ef%bf%bc-yelp/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 20:41:06 +0000 https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/how-to-boost-your-companys-social-networks-with-video%ef%bf%bc-yelp/ Thousands of potential customers browse Instagram Reels, Tiktok and other video platforms every day, eager to get a behind-the-scenes look at a favorite hairstylist, home entrepreneur or chef. Hubspot reports that people have almost doubled their online video consumption in just four years. To reach customers where they’re scrolling, small business owners must follow the […]]]>

Thousands of potential customers browse Instagram Reels, Tiktok and other video platforms every day, eager to get a behind-the-scenes look at a favorite hairstylist, home entrepreneur or chef. Hubspot reports that people have almost doubled their online video consumption in just four years. To reach customers where they’re scrolling, small business owners must follow the trend.

Anne Faire, Yelp’s San Diego Community Manager, has made over a hundred reels on Instagram, with a view count of nearly three million. A self-taught content creator, she learned key ways to apply Instagram’s algorithm, keep followers engaged, and grow an evergreen content library.

Below, Anne shares four tips for business owners to improve their social media video performance.

You don’t need expensive equipment to be successful on social media. Anne recommends the following tools to help you create video content:

  • A basic tripod that can wrap around objects
  • A small lightbox to complete when shooting in poor lighting
  • Video editing apps like InShot (free) and Mojo ($9.99/month)
  • A scheduling tool like Later or Schedule to help organize your post

2. Aim for consistency, not perfection

As a business owner, you may not have the extra time or energy to create content. It can be tempting to post intermittently, when you find that gem of an Instagram reel. But according to Anne, the algorithm prioritizes consistency over perfection.

This means that a bad video won’t hurt your engagement. Instead, treat each post as a quick snack for the consumer. “[Videos are] just digital popcorn,” she said. “If you’re scrolling and you eat a bag of popcorn, and it was a little burnt…you’re not just going to throw the whole bowl away and say, ‘I’m never going to eat popcorn again. “”

Meta, the umbrella company of Facebook and Instagram, reports that the average attention span for a piece of content on its platforms is just right. 1.7 seconds on a mobile device. When creating your content strategy, take the pressure off by remembering that viewers aren’t scrutinizing your videos.

Pro tip: Anne recommends keeping your videos 15 seconds or less.

3. Stick to what you already do

Posting consistently requires a lot of footage, but you don’t have to go all out to set up shoots. Business owners already have a wealth of content at their fingertips. You have more content than you think, especially as a business owner on Yelp,” Anne said. “You can see what content people want to have and create content around that.”

Some of the best opportunities for social media are in what business owners see and do every day: behind-the-scenes footage of a chef at work, a 15-second clip showcasing a new product, a before-and-after a haircut or a kitchen makeover, the possibilities are endless.

Anne recommends looking at your Yelp reviews to identify what aspects customers love most about your business, like a popular dish or service, and highlighting them in your videos. To stay organized, she suggests keeping all photos of videos you or your staff take in a shared folder or “content library.” This way, you always have access to evergreen content, even if you decide to outsource your social media.

4. Don’t Stress Commitment

Engaging with your followers is a great way to improve your performance, but you don’t have to reinvent the wheel. Instead of trying to find the perfect combination of hashtags, keep it simple: reply to your followers in the comments or encourage viewers to tag a friend by offering discounts or freebies.

And most importantly, make sure you prioritize work-life balance. Checking notifications and responding to customers can be helpful, but it’s normal and healthy to check at the end of the day.

“If you are a business with hours of operation, I would probably be a little more aware during [business] hours,” Anne said. “But after hours is after hours… nothing is going to be an emergency.”

Editorial by Emily Moon and Jenna Spray


These lessons come from an episode of Behind the review, the weekly podcast from Yelp & Entrepreneur Media. Listen below to hear Elizabeth, or visit the episode page for more, subscribe to the show and explore other episodes.

The above information is provided for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to replace professional advice and may not be appropriate for your situation. Unless otherwise stated, reference to third-party links, services, or products does not constitute endorsement by Yelp.

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Reviews | Taylor Lorenz said an editor was to blame. Is it OK? https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/reviews-taylor-lorenz-said-an-editor-was-to-blame-is-it-ok/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 17:08:10 +0000 https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/reviews-taylor-lorenz-said-an-editor-was-to-blame-is-it-ok/ Placeholder while loading article actions UPDATE: The fallout from Lorenz’s story continues: On Thursday, members of The Post’s reporting team held a meeting with Post editor Sally Buzbee, senior editor Cameron Barr, Diversity and Inclusion Editor Krissah Thompson and Digital News Editor Kat Down Mulder. At issue was a letter from reporting staff quoting an […]]]>
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UPDATE: The fallout from Lorenz’s story continues: On Thursday, members of The Post’s reporting team held a meeting with Post editor Sally Buzbee, senior editor Cameron Barr, Diversity and Inclusion Editor Krissah Thompson and Digital News Editor Kat Down Mulder. At issue was a letter from reporting staff quoting an article from the daily beast identifying Associate Features Editor David Malitz as the one who inserted the error regarding requests for comments from YouTube content creators and noting that the matter “could cost” Malitz a promotion to Features Editor .

According to three sources present at the meeting, a reporter pressed on Buzbee’s details, saying his colleagues learned that Buzbee offered the job to Malitz on Thursday, June 2, and then rescinded the offer the following Monday. Buzbee, according to those sources, did not deny the timeline but insisted that Malitz was in no way being punished for his mistake. According to the sources, staff members who spoke at the meeting were furious with Buzbee’s decision and asked if it could be reversed. She was resistant to that suggestion, the sources say.

A Post spokeswoman said, “We will not comment.”

Washington Post writer Taylor Lorenz posted a Twitter thread on Saturday stating that she was not the one who inserted the error line in his article. It was his editor. “I didn’t write the line and didn’t know it was inserted”, wrote Lorenz.

“This should have been a small correction for miscommunication, but it turned into a multi-day media cycle, intentionally aimed at discrediting the Washington Post and me.”

A takeaway from Lorenz’s thread was unequivocal: “In a series of tweets, Lorenz blames her editor for inserting the error into her story and says she is the victim of a ‘bad faith’ campaign. “. tweeted CNN senior media reporter Oliver Darcy.

Blaming editors for mistakes sounds like a cowardly act, and indeed it can be. But it also happens occasionally in mainstream US media. Lorenz’s point you culpa however, is contrary to the spirit of postal policy. And in this case, he received approval from the Post’s masthead, according to a source at the newspaper. A Post spokesperson said, “We have provided information that we have asked him to consider.”

The imbroglio began a week ago with the publication of Lorenz’s article about internet content creators who thrived on the Johnny Depp-Amber Heard libel lawsuit. The original release said two creators — Alyte Mazeika and the anonymous ThatUmbrellaGuy — had been contacted for comment. FoxNews.com reported that the newspaper deleted this claim with a stealth edit. The Post published a series of corrections and an editor’s note attempting to remedy the situation. It now reads:

EDITOR’S NOTE

The first published version of this story incorrectly stated that internet influencers Alyte Mazeika and ThatUmbrellaGuy had been contacted for comment prior to publication. In fact, only Mazeika was solicited, via Instagram. After the story was published, The Post continued to seek comments from Mazeika via social media and interviewed ThatUmbrellaGuy for the first time. During this process, The Post removed the incorrect reporting from the story but did not note its removal, a violation of our corrections policy. The story has been updated to note that Mazeika declined to comment for this story and ThatUmbrellaGuy could not be reached for comment.

An earlier version of this story also incorrectly attributed a quote to Adam Waldman, a lawyer for Johnny Depp. The quote describes how he contacted some internet influencers and was deleted.

Hot Air’s John Sexton underline that according to Lorenz’s own account, she did not contact any YouTubers for comment before the story was uploaded – a circumstance that conflicts with the editor’s note, and which indicates that Mazeika’s request for comment has took place before publication via Instagram.

We’ve asked The Post for clarification on this point, because it’s important: if The Post can’t state the facts in an editor’s note, what else should we trust it to do? “It remains as is,” a Post spokesperson said. “We will not be able to enter into internal discussions.”

Another question that looms over the editor’s note concerns politics. What if the first iteration had claimed that the error came from an editor’s keyboard? Such a statement would go against a long-standing provision of The Post’s standards guide, which reads: “We do not assign blame to individual journalists or editors (for example” due to ‘a reporting error’ or ‘due to an editing error’). (Telegraph Services, People Quoted, etc.) The policy controls how the newspaper articulates editor’s corrections and notes, and has a more tenuous influence over the Post’s tweets and other statements.

In a 2006 column, then-ombudsman Deborah Howell traced the philosophical roots of the Post’s aversion to “due to an editing error.” Then-editor Len Downie told Howell, “Journalists get bylines and awards when they’re successful, and editors don’t.” Peter Baker, then White House correspondent for the Post, countered: “The writers are held accountable because our names are on the lines. Why should writers be held accountable when it’s not their fault? »

Correct, says the New York Times. Readers close to this newspaper know that general-purpose journalist Christine Chung made not trash the status of Lincoln College in Illinois, which is a predominantly black college, not a historically black college, as her May 9 story originally reported. This is because a correction directly addresses the source of the error: “Due to an editing error, an earlier version of this article incorrectly identified Lincoln College as a historically black college. It is a predominantly black college, not an HBCU listed by the Department of Education”

Philip B. Corbett, associate editor for standards at The Times, told the Erik Wemple blog via email: “[T]This has long been our usual practice. It’s simply an effort to be fair to reporters — whose names appear on the story — and protect them from criticism if they weren’t responsible for an error.

Many points of sale, including CNNthe Associated Press, USA today, Slate, MSNBC, the daily beast – and yes, even the post office! — have at least tried that wording (although a CNN spokeswoman notes that it is not policy to attribute errors to editors, and an AP spokeswoman writes via email: “ Corrections usually focus on what is corrected”).

Decades ago, the Post’s institutional approach to corrections made more sense. Journalists’ work at the time was not stolen from social media sites, dissected for errors, and repurposed for the next case of wrongdoing or alleged wrongdoing. These days it is. If The Post’s policy argument was ever correct, it is no longer the case.

And if The Post revises its corrections policy, it might want to establish a guideline or two on how its reporters respond to social media hubbub. “We have a responsibility to recognize these bad faith campaigns for what they are and when this stuff does and does not deserve recognition,” Lorenz wrote after the outcry over his Depp-Heard article. She also rapped on CNN: “This kind of coverage is so irresponsible and dangerous.” Lorenz wrote on Twitter. “This is twisting my words to amplify a fabricated outrage campaign by right-wing media outlets and radicalized influencers, who are waging a vicious campaign of harassment/vilification against me. CNN is happily piling up.

This outrage works much better when a 135-word editor’s note isn’t hanging over your article.

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June 8 live updates: Twitter to share data with Musk, Turkey warns Ukraine war is fueling food crisis https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/june-8-live-updates-twitter-to-share-data-with-musk-turkey-warns-ukraine-war-is-fueling-food-crisis/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 20:13:01 +0000 https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/june-8-live-updates-twitter-to-share-data-with-musk-turkey-warns-ukraine-war-is-fueling-food-crisis/ Inditex owns brands such as Zara, Massimo Dutti and Pull and Bear © Bloomberg Inditex, the world’s largest apparel retailer, posted an 80% increase in net profit in the first quarter as sales surged above pre-pandemic levels. The owner of brands such as Zara, Massimo Dutti and Pull and Bear said net sales for three […]]]>

Inditex owns brands such as Zara, Massimo Dutti and Pull and Bear © Bloomberg

Inditex, the world’s largest apparel retailer, posted an 80% increase in net profit in the first quarter as sales surged above pre-pandemic levels.

The owner of brands such as Zara, Massimo Dutti and Pull and Bear said net sales for three months, from February to the end of April, increased by 36% to 6.7 billion euros, as store footfall took strongly picked up. The profit for the quarter amounted to 760 million euros.

Online sales, which exploded at the height of the coronavirus pandemic, were down just 6% year-on-year, the Spanish group said.

Óscar García Maceiras, chief executive, said the group’s performance was supported by a “well-differentiated business model” and “a strategic focus on innovation, digitization and sustainability”.

The net result would have reached 940 million euros excluding a provision of 216 million euros on the estimated costs related to Ukraine and Russia. The group said Inditex stores in both countries, including its online platforms, had been “temporarily closed” since February 24, the date of the Russian invasion.

The company has around 500 stores in Russia, its second largest market in terms of stores.

Sales at the company’s 67 stores in China were hit by Covid-related restrictions, but the United States consolidated its position as the group’s second largest market with “notable growth”, Inditex said.

Inditex posted a gross margin of 60.1%, the highest in a decade. Operating costs increased by 24%.

As part of a three-year deal worth more than €100 million signed in May, Inditex has pledged to buy 30% of future production of a textile fiber called Infinna created entirely from textile waste.

The company proposes to pay a total dividend of €0.93 per share on 2022 earnings.

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Microsoft launches public preview of NGINX for Azure as a SaaS solution on its Marketplace https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/microsoft-launches-public-preview-of-nginx-for-azure-as-a-saas-solution-on-its-marketplace/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 12:04:01 +0000 https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/microsoft-launches-public-preview-of-nginx-for-azure-as-a-saas-solution-on-its-marketplace/ Microsoft recently announced NGINX for Azure, a natively integrated software solution (SaaS) with advanced traffic management and monitoring. The service is available in preview in Azure Marketplace. NGINX for Azure is the result of close collaboration between Microsoft and F5the company behind the open source solution Nginx – one of the most used traffic managers. […]]]>

Microsoft recently announced NGINX for Azure, a natively integrated software solution (SaaS) with advanced traffic management and monitoring. The service is available in preview in Azure Marketplace.

NGINX for Azure is the result of close collaboration between Microsoft and F5the company behind the open source solution Nginx – one of the most used traffic managers. The fully managed Azure Nginx offering provides a simplified developer experience for deployment, management, billing, and support.

Azure integration enables easy provisioning and configuration in a few steps in the Azure portal. Users can take advantage of advanced traffic management features, such as JSON Web Token (JWT) Authentication and active health checks, with built-in security integrations such as Azure Key Vault for SSL/TLS certificate management.

Source: https://www.nginx.com/blog/introducing-f5-nginx-for-azure-load-balancing-available-natively-as-saas-offering-on-microsoft-azure/

On a technical community blog post about the preview of Nginx for Azure, Rohit TatacharSenior PM at Microsoft said:

The service integrates the Nginx SaaS offer into the Azure infrastructure (Control Plane). With this integration, you will be able to provision a new Nginx service and configure your Azure resources to leverage Nginx as a reverse proxy/load balancer.

Additionally, users can also bring their existing Nginx configuration file (single or multiple files) and apply it directly to Ngnix for Azure or via CI-CD pipelines via GitHub integrations.

Overall, the objective of the offer is to facilitate the use of Nginx. Chris GuzikowskiProduct Marketing Manager, NGINX at F5, said in an Nginx blog post:

Above all, NGINX Plus is no longer an “external” solution. NGINX for Azure unleashes the power of NGINX Plus fully within your Azure environment, reducing your overall stack complexity.

In addition, Jeff GirouxGlobal Solutions Architect at F5, explains in an F5 community article the advantage of using Nginx for Azure:

F5 NGINX for Azure frees you from having to deploy your own NGINX Plus cluster, install libraries, upgrade, and other tasks. Whether you’re an existing or new NGINX customer, that means speed and simplicity with no IaaS to manage. This ease of use means there is no need for specialist knowledge, which is especially great for customers new to NGINX.

Pricing for NIGNX for Azure starts at $0.01, and more pricing details are available at pricing page. Additionally, details of the SaaS offering itself are available on the documentation landing page.

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Coinbase Hiring Halts for the ‘Foreseeable Future’ and Will Cancel Offers https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/coinbase-hiring-halts-for-the-foreseeable-future-and-will-cancel-offers/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 01:06:00 +0000 https://ascensionriskmanagement.com/coinbase-hiring-halts-for-the-foreseeable-future-and-will-cancel-offers/ Two weeks after announcing plans to slow down hiring, crypto exchange Coinbase now says the freeze will continue for “the foreseeable future.” The company will also draw accepted job offers. Coinbase said it is notifying prospects of canceled offers via email on Thursday. The company also said it was extending its dismissal policy to such […]]]>

Two weeks after announcing plans to slow down hiring, crypto exchange Coinbase now says the freeze will continue for “the foreseeable future.” The company will also draw accepted job offers.

Coinbase said it is notifying prospects of canceled offers via email on Thursday. The company also said it was extending its dismissal policy to such people and would help them find jobs and revise their CVs.

“After evaluating our business priorities, current headcount, and vacancies, we have decided to put hiring on hold for as long as this macro environment requires,” LJ Brock, Coinbase’s chief human resources officer, wrote in a statement. blog post Thursday. “The extended hiring pause will include replacements, except for roles that are necessary to meet the high standards we have set for safety and compliance, or to support other critical work.”

Coinbase Co-Founder and CEO Brian Armstrong speaks onstage during “Tales from the Crypto: What the Currency of the Future Means for You” at Vanity Fair’s 6th Annual New Establishment Summit at the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts on October 23, 2019 in Beverly Hills, California.

Matt Winkelmeyer | Getty Images

Coinbase has lost more than 70% of its value this year as the cryptocurrency sell-off coupled with economic turmoil has led to lower user numbers and lower revenue. The pain is being felt across much of the tech sector, with Uber and Facebook parent company Meta taking similar action, and Robinhood cutting its workforce by around 9%.

Prior to the 2022 downturn, Coinbase was among the top performers in the tech industry. The company tripled the size of its workforce last year to 3,730 employees. Following its Nasdaq debut in April 2021, Coinbase reported a 12-fold increase in second-quarter sales to $2.28 billion, while profits soared 4,900% to $1.6 billion.

But the tech companies with the highest growth rates last year have been the hardest hit this year, as investors turn to assets deemed safer in a world of rising interest rates and rising inflation. arrow. With bitcoin down more than a third this year and ethereum down 50%, fewer people are flocking to Coinbase to open accounts and transact.

Coinbase said last month that revenue in the last quarter fell 27% from a year earlier, while total trading volume fell from $547 billion in the fourth quarter to $309 billion over the past few months. first three months of 2022.

“We always knew crypto would be volatile, but this volatility alongside larger economic factors could test the business, and us personally, in new ways,” Brock wrote in Thursday’s post. “If we are flexible and resilient and stay focused on the long term, Coinbase will come out stronger on the other side.”

LOOK: ‘Halftime Report’ investment committee weighs in on fintech

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