Athletes bring the Tokyo 2020 Olympics to fans: YouTube, TikTok – WWD

No spectators, no problem.

Thanks to a multitude of social media platforms, athletes could always show their fans their experiences at the Tokyo Summer Olympics. From longer video blogs on YouTube to fun short clips on TikTok, it’s safe to say that some athletes have taken advantage of their free time to create content for their subscribers.

In the foreground is TikTok, which has taken the internet by storm for the past two years, especially at the start of the pandemic. One of the biggest famous TikTok athletes to emerge at this year’s games was Ilona Maher, a 24-year-old American rugby player.

Maher was very popular even before the Olympics started due to clips showing his humor and outspoken manners. The most successful video on the internet is where she and other American athletes decided to test the strength of the cardboard beds that each Olympian slept on while performing different activities. Turns out the beds were very secure despite being made of cardboard.

@ilonamaher

My screen time has nothing to be proud of # tokyo2020 #beastbeautybrains #olympics #usarugby #tokyoolympics #olympictiktok #teamusa

♬ I am a survivor – Reba McEntire

Other athletes who presented a deep insight into their time at the Olympics included the US Women’s Gymnastics Team. Each member has a TikTok account and posts frequently while in Tokyo. Sunisa “Suni” Lee and Jordan Chiles took advantage of their free time to download short clips of themselves dancing.

Germany’s Alica Schmidt, who came to the Olympics for athletics, shared her experience via TikTok giving viewers a feel for their living spaces, the gym, the Olympic Village dining room, which is open 24 hours a day, and freebies they have been given so far.

Kelsey Robinson, volleyball player for the United States, posted a TikTok of a “training day at the Olympics,” which showed her doing her daily COVID-19 test before heading to the dining room for breakfast. He also showed clips of them exploring the Olympic Village and training at the High Performance Center, which serves as a private training facility specifically for American athletes.

According to Robinson, the village had autonomous shuttles, free manicures and pedicures, vending machines that can dispense free drinks after scanning a specific ID, and a massage and relaxation center.

@kelseymarierobinson

Dinner at the Olympic Village #tokyoolympics #teamusa #fyp シ #olympicspirit #volleyball #LeadWithLove

I’m so hungry – Karter Zaher

Robinson also shared what it was like to walk during the Opening Ceremony, even giving viewers a glimpse of other athletes singing a happy birthday to American basketball player Kevin Durant – though his birthday isn’t going to be amazing until after. September 29.

Meanwhile, athletes such as MyKayla Skinner, Tom Daley and Matisse Thybulle shared their experiences via YouTube vlogs. The most active of the three was Daley, a diver from the UK who won gold in the men’s 10-meter synchronized platform with his diving partner Matty Lee.

Daley, who already posts frequently as a regular vlogger, racked up millions of views during his time in Tokyo, uploading videos such as a tour of their apartment (which looks a lot like a college dorm), the Olympic Village, a question-and-answer session with Lee and one commemorating his gold medal.

He also touched on COVID-19 regulations, such as daily testing and contact tracing on each athlete’s phone. “They tell us that no news is good news because you only find out about your results if you are positive,” Daley said in one of his videos. “We have contract tracking on our phones, so if we come in contact near someone in the dining room, for example, with COVID-19, we get a notification and we have to isolate ourselves. “

Skinner, a gymnast from the United States, was already an active YouTube vlogger, documenting her daily life before the Olympics. His first video at the Games, titled “Come to the Olympics With Me,” has over 1.4 million views and has counted since its publication date. The 30-minute vlog detailed everything from its packaging process to the flight to Tokyo and exploring the village.

Skinner also mentioned that the American gymnastics team does not stay in the Village, unlike most athletes, but in hotels. She explained that the team did not want the gymnasts to be around other athletes due to COVID-19.

“We are staying in a hotel, we are not in the Olympic Village because they don’t want us around other athletes just because they don’t want us to get COVID-19,” she said in her video, revealing her slight disappointment since she could not stay in the Olympic Village during the last Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro either.

Skinner supplemented her video by speaking to the camera about her thoughts and feelings about her last Olympics, as she announced that she would be retiring from professional gymnastics after the Summer Games.

Thybulle became a vlogging superstar during the NBA bubble last year, where he documented his experience each week while playing for the Philadelphia 76ers in Orlando. Thybulle has dual American and Australian citizenship, but chose to play for the latter at the Olympics.

With his fans asking him to document his time in his first Summer Games, Thybulle has posted weekly vlogs, but not as often as someone like Daley, for example. So far, Thybulle has uploaded three episodes of his “Road to Tokyo” series, sharing his training experience with the Boomers in Los Angeles and Las Vegas. He has yet to post any content on his Tokyo presence, but fans are expecting at least a little more from the basketball player in the coming weeks, as the Australian team lost to the Americans in the basketball semifinals. -ball.

As the Olympics wrap up other Games, fans joked that TikTok was the go-to channel to follow. Some athletes may have a future as full bloggers after their stay in Tokyo.

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